Posts filed under ‘Temas-Content’

Migration crisis

http://www.euronews.com/2016/03/07/migrant-crisis-ankara-under-pressure-to-act-at-emergency-summit/

http://www.euronews.com/2016/03/04/eu-plan-to-save-schengen-unveiled-ahead-of-crunch-summit/

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35742625

EXERCISE

http://www.euenglish.hu/2015/09/2-in-1-news-english-the-european-migrant-crisis-explained/

http://www.euenglish.hu/2015/09/follow-the-news-1-european-migration-rift/

http://www.newsflashenglish.com/

http://www.newsflashenglish.com/files/lesson-pdfs/migration-crisis-2016.pdf

BASIC VOCABULARY

http://www.practicaespanol.com/en/refugees-crisis-spanishenglish-vocabulary/

March 7, 2016 at 4:48 pm Leave a comment

TRAVEL-22nd March

HERE  YOU HAVE THE MATERIAL Tourism_overview

VIDEOS

March 18, 2011 at 9:25 am Leave a comment

Europe-Travelling-Stereotypes

MATERIAL

EU Stereotypes

February 25, 2011 at 11:19 am Leave a comment

SPORTS

The file is structured in 3 parts:
– The reading comprehension takes the greater part of it. It contains 3 authentic articles – 2 American and 1 Welsh. Don’t get frightened by the lists of words and expressions. For many of you they’ll be for future use, if you persist in studying English and want to use it for professional purposes. However, please try to read the articles and use some of their arguments to defend your point in class (the second hour we’ll try to ‘debate’).
There are also lists of sports in English with pictures and tables with the verbs that go with them

grammar reference
It deals with Passive Voice in English or passive structures. I don’t have the time in class to teach you grammar. Many of you must have studied it, but the reason to make you revise it is that the articles use passive structures profusely. They are typical in formal speech and especially for any kind of report, including in the media. A set of 3 exercises is also provided to assist you in testing your knowledge on Passives.

functional languageMake your point
This part introdices you to the language of debate and structuring a speech. I tried to use the same topic – sports and children. The register is a little bit higher for you, but the example is only for reference. More important are the lists of collocations most often used in discussions and debates, Pay attention to them and try to memorise some so you can use them during our second hour in class on Tuesday.

Why is PE important

February 18, 2011 at 10:35 am Leave a comment

Last session.San Valentine

Hello to all,
I hope that you are having an excellent week!  For our last class, Monday, February 14th, we’ll have fun with Valentine’s Day.  I’m attaching 2 documents that we’ll be using in class that day.  One is a list of terms of endearment, while the other is an activity with conversation hearts.  You might want to consider using them in your own classes next week.  The activity that I’ve prepared is more advanced, of course, but it could be adapted for lower levels as well.
Here’s an example of what conversation hearts look like:  http://familyfun.go.com/assets/cms/pdf/printables/0109c_Conversation_Hearts_fin.pdf
Here are some hearts that you can use for this activity:  http://www.coloringcastle.com/pdfs/hearts/100-hearts.pdf
Also, here’s the movie trailer activity powerpoint that Pilar asked me to send you.  It is two pages; the first one was used by Ricardo for his class.
See you Monday!

February 10, 2011 at 12:19 pm Leave a comment

7 th February .

7-feb1

7 feb 3

7 feb 3

February 7th, we’ll watch and talk about a few movie trailers and then discuss technology.  Here’s an interesting and current article that I annotated for you (though it says ‘Ricardo,’ I’m the one who made those comments… that’s technology, not always as flexible as we would like), as well as some questions that we’ll consider in our discussion.

February 7, 2011 at 1:45 pm Leave a comment

Science

we’ll be talking about science (as requested :-).  Take a look at this website for an idea of some of the themes we’ll discuss:  http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/0_0_0/whathassciencedone_01.

I’m going to design some activities dealing with the information on the first two pages.  An annotated version doesn’t seem necessary, as the language itself is fairly straightforward.  We’ll be talking about the concepts and science in general on Monday, January 31st.
Here’s the plan for our last three classes:
January 31st – Science!
February 7th – Technology, including cell phones

Mensa Invitational Winners

The  Washington Post’s Mensa Invitational once again  invited readers to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding,  subtracting, or changing one letter, and supply a new  definition.

Here are the winners:

1. Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house, which renders  the subject financially impotent for an indefinite period of  time.

2. Ignoranus : A person who’s both stupid and an  asshole.

3. Intaxicaton : Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts  until you realize it was your money to start with.

4. Reintarnation : Coming back to life as a hillbilly.

5. Bozone ( n.): The substance surrounding stupid people  that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately,  shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

6. Foreploy : Any misrepresentation about yourself for the  purpose of getting laid..

7. Giraffiti : Vandalism spray-painted very, very high

8. Sarchasm : The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit  and the person who doesn’t get it.

9. Inoculatte : To take coffee intravenously when you are  running late.

10. Osteopornosis : A degenerate disease. (This one got extra credit.)

11. Karmageddon : It’s like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it’s like, a serious bummer.

12. Decafalon (n.): The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you.

13. Glibido : All talk and no action.

14. Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly.

15. Arachnoleptic Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you’ve accidentally walked through a spider web.

16. Beelzebug (n.): Satan in the form of a mosquito, that gets into your bedroom at three in the morning  and cannot be cast out.

17. Caterpallor ( n.): The color you turn after finding half a worm in the fruit you’re eating.

The  Washington Post has  also published the winning submissions to its yearly contest, in which  readers are asked to supply alternate meanings for common  words.

And the winners  are:

1. Coffee,  n. The person upon whom one coughs.

2. Flabbergasted, adj. Appalled by discovering how much weight one has gained.

3. Abdicate, v. To give up all hope of ever  having a flat stomach.

4. Esplanade, v. To attempt an explanation while drunk.

5. Willy-nilly, adj. Impotent.

6. Negligent, adj. Absentmindedly answering the door when wearing only a nightgown.

7. Lymph, v. To walk with a lisp.

8. Gargoyle, n. Olive-flavored mouthwash.

9. Flatulence, n. Emergency vehicle that picks up someone who has been run over by a  steamroller.

10. Balderdash, n. A rapidly receding hairline.

11. Testicle, n. A humorous question on an exam.

12. Rectitude, n. The formal, dignified bearing adopted  by proctologists.

13. Pokemon, n. A Rastafarian proctologist.

14. Oyster, n. A person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms.

15. Frisbeetarianism, n. The belief that, after death, the soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there.

16. Circumvent, n. An opening in the front of  boxer shorts worn by Jewish men.

January 31, 2011 at 4:02 pm Leave a comment

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